1964 & 1965 Official Guidebook Entries


The description of this exhibit from the 1964 Official Guide Book

Cover- 1964 Guidebook

The description of this exhibit from the 1965 Official Guide Book

Cover - 1965 Guidebook

The location of this exhibit on the 1964 Official Souvenir Map

Cover - 1964 Official Souvenir Map

AFRICAN PAVILION 

A village of round huts representing 24 nations of sub-Saharan Africa stands on a broad platform erected on stilts above water. A giant model of a banyan tree towers above the platform. Built into the branches of the tree are small huts that make up the pavilion's restaurant. Within the privately sponsored village are caged wild animals, an entertainment area where tribal groups demonstrate their skills and - a less primitive touch - a movie theater. The huts, ancient in design but fashioned of plastics and wood to suggest Africa's modern outlook, display museum collections of folk art and offer for sale African products that range from five-cent postcards to $500 diamonds. In the restaurant, amid weapons, masks and caged birds, waiters in tribal attire serve African dishes modified for the American palate.
* Admission: adults, $1.00; children, 50 cents. 
Highlights
LIONS AT THE GATE. Inside the pavilion's main gate, cages of lions, leopards and other animals line the path to the movie theater. Around the theater, an exhibit area displays samples of Africa's natural resources, including copper, tin, rubber and diamonds.
AFRICA ON FILM. Near the theater entrance, photographs, flags and a huge map provide a brief introduction to the participating nations. Inside, a 10-minute film presents a geographical survey of Africa's scenic wonders and industrial developments.
ANTELOPES AND ARTIFACTS. Huts sheltering antelopes, monkeys, zebras, giraffes and exotic birds are interspersed among exhibit and sales huts which display works of art in gold, silver and ivory from each of the participating nations: Burundi, Cameroun, Central African Republic, Chad, Republic of Congo, Congo, Ivory Coast, Dahomey, Ethiopia, Gabon, Ghana, Kenya, Liberia, Mauritania, Niger, Nigeria, Uganda, Upper Volta, Malagasy Republic, Somalia, Rwanda, Senegal, Tanganyika, Togo.
DANCERS AND DRUMMERS. In the pavilion's open-air entertainment area, tall, graceful Watusi men from Rwanda perform spirited dances and demonstrate their prowess at high-jumping. Burundi drummers and West African dancers also perform.
THREE-HOUSE RESTAURANT. The multilevel rooms of the tree-house restaurant and bar are reached by a winding staircase that girdles the tree's massive trunk. The restaurant features special delicacies of a number of regions, including chicken, lamb and pork dishes garnished with a peanut sauce.

AFRICAN PAVILION

A hut-village on stilts, representing 26 African nations, offers wild animals, tribal dancers and a tree-house restaurant.

Above a platform supporting the village rises a giant banyan tree, whose branches hold the small huts of the pavilion's restaurant. Below are a movie theater, collections of folk art, and shops selling various African products.

THE ANIMAL KINGDOM. Near the main gate are cages of African animals: gorillas, lions, leopards, giraffes, monkeys, baby elephants. In addition, huts sheltering exotic birds are interspersed among exhibit and sales areas.
A CONTINENT ON FILM. In the theater a 12-minute film surveys Africa's many scenic wonders and its recent industrial progress.
AFRICAN ARTIFACTS. Shops sell arts and crafts of each of the participating nations: Burundi, Cameroun, Central African Republic, Chad, Republic of Congo, Congo, Ivory Coast, Dahomey, Ethiopia, Gabon, Ghana, Kenya, Liberia, Malawi, Mauritania, Niger, Nigeria, Uganda, Upper Volta, Malagasy Republic, Somalia, Rwanda, Senegal, Zambia, Tanzania, Togo.
DANCERS AND DRUMMERS. Featured are high-jumping Watusi warriors seven feet tall, Zulu dancers and a Nigerian dance-and-drum troupe.
TREE-HOUSE RESTAURANT. Delicacies include chicken garnished with peanut sauce, beef curry, lobster and couscous. The bar features an exotic "African Punch."
 
Admission: adults, $1.50; children, 50 cents..

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