World's Fair Information Manual


EXHIBIT
Coca-Cola Exhibit
 
AUTHORIZED REPRESENTATIVE
Mr. Harold Sharp, Vice President
The Coca-Cola Company
P.O. Box 1734
Atlanta 1, Georgia
404 TR 5-3411
and
Mr. Wayne McConnell, Manager
National Sales
405 Lexington Avenue
New York 17, New York
MU2-5761
 
CONTRACT SIGNED
February 21, 1961
 
ADMISSION
Free
LOCATION
Block 17; Lot 2
Industrial Area
 
AREA
46,314 sq. ft.
 
ARCHITECT
Welton, Becket & Assocs.
300 Park Avenue
New York 22, New York
PL1-1540
 
EXHIBIT DESIGNER
The Displayers, Inc.
635 West 54th Street
New York 19, New York
PL7-6500
 
CONTRACTOR
George A. Fuller

SOURCE: 1964 World's Fair Information Manual

FEATURES
The Theme of the Coca-Cola Exhibit is "World of Refreshment".
 
Exterior: The two story building will be elliptical in form, with a center court. White sculptural arch
forms support a gold screen at the street facade framing the main entrance. Visitors will enter the building via a wide ramp into a breathtaking forecourt framed by a series of ten arches which will repeat the exterior of the building arches, but on a larger scale. Soft blues and greens will contrast with the white arches and gold screen. The entire exhibition will be surrounded by a moat-like pool.
 
Interior: The exhibit will feature a free global holiday, taking visitors on a simulated trip around the world. They will not only view six exotic scenes, but also smell, hear, taste and touch the places visited. The visitor first will be taken to Hong Kong, where he will hear the sound of people mingling with the sound of windbells, the clatter of rickshaws on cobblestone streets. From there the visitor will be taken to view the Taj Mahal in moonlight. Then off to a Bavarian ski lodge and the smell and feel of a blazing fireplace, and then a tropical forest in Cambodia to her the calls of birds and chatter of monkeys. The fifth scene will place the visitor on an ocean liner off Rio de Janerio where he will feel the motion of the ship and taste the salt spray. And finally, he will visit New Orleans for the Mardi Gras.
 
The three-sided Tower of Music, as large as a 12-story building, will rise 120 feet. The tower will be the musical voice of the Fair, and will strike the time of day. Its tones will be heard throughout the Fair. The Tower of Music will house a 610-bell electronic carillon. It will be the largest carillon in the world. At various heights in the tower will be banks of speakers which will cover the full range and frequency, thereby creating a true outdoor hi-fi effect. The console will be completely enclosed in glass, permitting visitors to view the musician as he performs. Recitals of a wide variety of musical programs with full orchestration will be given several times each day by famous carillonneurs from all over the world.
 

Another aspect of the Coca-Cola pavilion is a communication center installed by the American Radio Relay League, the national non-profit membership association of 100,000 amateur radio operators which will celebrate its 50th anniversary during the opening of the Fair. Amateur operators, upon presentation of credentials, will be allowed to broadcast from the studio to other amateurs throughout the world. Educational information regarding the scientific hobby will be available. Visitors to the pavilion will be able to watch and listen in on these foreign communications.

A USO World's Fair referral and information lounge to accommodate military personnel and their dependents will occupy 1,110 square feet of space in the exhibit. Plans call for a direct tie-line between the USO Times Square Club and the USO World's Fair Club. It is estimated that one million American and Allied Service personnel and their families will use the facilities during the 1964-1965 seasons.

More Content