1964 & 1965 Official Guidebook Entries


The description of this exhibit from the 1964 Official Guide Book

Cover- 1964 Guidebook

The description of this exhibit from the 1965 Official Guide Book

Cover - 1965 Guidebook

The location of this exhibit on the 1964 Official Souvenir Map

Cover - 1964 Official Souvenir Map

GENERAL ELECTRIC

Under a huge, gleaming dome suspended from spiraling pipes, the GE exhibit, called "Progressland," depicts the history of electricity, from its beginning to the mighty bang of nuclear fusion. The multipart show, produced by Walt Disney, uses a unique theater. Here the seated audience is carried past a number of stages; there are reflecting mirrors, startling visual and sound projections, and in the climax, neutron counters and other instruments to document graphically the demonstration of controlled thermonuclear fusion.

* Admission: free.
* Length of show: 45 minutes; 250 people admitted every four minutes.
  Highlights
CAROUSEL THEATER. In the first part of the program, separate auditoriums, each holding 250 people, circle into position and are carried past stages on which life-sized, three-dimensional, animated human figures move, talk, laugh and act out the story of electricity in the home from the Gay '90s to the present.
A late 19th Century home is shown. Its inhabitants struggle with all the latest luxuries: telephone, gas lamps, gramophone, kitchen pump, a hand-cranked clothes washer and a hand-pumped, air-suction vacuum cleaner.
A home of the '20s comes next, with coffeemakers and sewing machines, "monitor"-topped refrigerators and a homemade cooling device for hot weather: an electric fan that circulates air over a cake of ice.
The '40s are recalled with the little, round television screen, plus some odd applications of electricity: e.g., housewives mixing wallpaper paste with cake mixers.
The glories of today glitter in a living room at Christmastime, a glass-enclosed, electrically heated patio, a kitchen that all but runs itself.
THE CORRIDOR OF MIRRORS. Visitors pass through a hall in which giant photos of General Electric scientists and engineers - at work on laser rays, space technology, nuclear experiments and low-temperature research - are reflected and re-reflected in mirrors.
THE SKY-DOME SPECTACULAR. By means of a dramatic new projection technique, the interior of the great dome is filled with the sights and sounds of the great natural sources of energy: fierce electrical storms, fire, a blazing sun and thousand of spinning atoms. A narrator describes man's historic search to harness energy and introduces the fusion experiment to follow.
FUSION ON EARTH. In the first demonstration of controlled thermonuclear fusion to be witnessed by a large general audience, a magnetic field squeezes a plasma of deuterium gas for a few millionths of a second at a temperature of 20 million degrees Fahrenheit. There is a vivid flash and a loud report as atoms collide, creating free energy (evidenced on instruments).
ELECTRIC LIVING. Apart from the scheduled show, a model all-electric community is on display with the latest electric innovations for the home, public buildings, industry and space exploration.

GENERAL ELECTRIC

In a one-hour show, the changes electricity has brought in American living are dramatized by life-sized, animated figures created by Walt Disney.

Visitors also see graphic displays of GE's scientific achievements, climaxed by a demonstration of controlled nuclear fusion.

CAROUSEL THEATER. Audiences seated in separate auditoriums are carried past a four-part circular stage on which animated human figures act out the story of electricity from the Gay Nineties to the present. In the opening scene, a family struggles with such "appliances" as gas lamps and a kitchen pump. In the final scene, the electrical wonders of today glitter in a living room at Christmastime, in an electrically heated patio and in a kitchen that all but runs itself
SKY-DOME SPECTACULAR. On passing through a photographic display of GE scientists at work, visitors enter the Sky Dome, which is filled with the sights and sounds of the great natural sources of energy: fierce electrical storms, fire, a blazing sun and spinning atoms. A narrator describes man's historic efforts to harness energy.
FUSION ON EARTH. In a spectacular demonstration of controlled nuclear fusion, a magnetic field squeezes a plasma of deuterium gas for a few millionths of a second at a temperature of 50 million degrees Fahrenheit. There is a vivid flash and a loud report as atoms fuse and free energy is released.
ELECTRIC LIVING. On the first floor, an all-electric community of exhibits displays the latest innovations for the home, public buildings, industry and space exploration.

Admission: free. A new show starts every four minutes.

11.08.02 Revised 09.23.17

There's a great big beautiful tomorrow waiting for you at Progressland - Walt Disney's presentation for General Electric at the Fair. Come and see why this show endures as one of the Fair's greatest legacies.

Note: This feature contains materials related to a Walt Disney production. nywf64.com is not affiliated in any way with The Walt Disney Company or any of its subsidiaries.All illustrations and most text should be considered © The Walt Disney Company (unless specifically noted otherwise)

 

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