Press Release / Photos


OFFICIAL WORLD'S FAIR COLOR TV COMMUNICATIONS CENTER

The Radio Corporation of America building at the 1964-65 New York World's Fair has been designated the Fair's Official Color Television Communications Center. The Center, a model of which is shown above, will feature a spectator-type, fully equipped color TV programming facility that will be the focal point for spot TV coverage of Fair news and special events, interviews with important visitors, and a variety of entertainment shows. The programs will be distributed through what will be the nation's largest closed-circuit color TV network to an estimated 200 outlets on the Fair grounds.

RCA Pavilion model


RADIO CORPORATION OF AMERICA - 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA - NEW YORK 20, N.Y.

MURRAY HILL 9-7200

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for release: Immediately

April 11, 1963

 

 RCA WORLD'S FAIR EXHIBIT TO SERVE AS OFFICIAL
 
COLOR TELEVISION COMMUNICATIONS CENTER
 Special Fair Events, Celebrity Interviews And Information
And Entertainment Shows Will Be Programmed Daily
On Nation's Largest Closed-Circuit Color TV
Network; Fair To Use Center For Hourly
News Bulletins

The Radio Corporation of America will participate in the 1964-1965 New York World's Fair with an exhibit that will serve as the Fair's Official Color Television Communications Center, Dr. Elmer W. Engstrom, RCA President, and Robert Moses, President of the World's Fair Corporation, announced jointly today.

The RCA Color TV Center, operating in an ultra-modern building located near the principal entrance to the Fair grounds, will feature:

1. A spectator-type, fully equipped color TV program center where visitors will have a panoramic view of all that goes into the production of color programs.

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2. The nation's largest closed-circuit color TV network, linking the Center to an estimated 200 receiving points throughout the Fair grounds.

3. A "See yourself in living color" demonstration.

4. A color television mobile unit that will move about the grounds to pick up events of interest for transmission over the system.

5. Listening rooms for stereo and hi-fi enthusiasts.

"We feel that both the RCA exhibit and the Fair-wide color network are attuned to the spirit of the Fair itself in their blending of entertainment, culture, and information through the latest and most comprehensive means of communications," Dr. Engstrom said.

"The Fair itself is, in essence, a great venture in communications that is designed to convey to millions the substance and excitement of life in the 1960's," he added.

Mr. Moses said: "We are particularly happy to welcome RCA at Flushing Meadows where they introduced black-and-white television to the American public at the 1939-1940 World's Fair. The Color Television Communications Center will not only provide an important service to the anticipated 70 million visitors to the Fair, but will also play a prime role in promoting the Fair's theme, 'Peace Through Understanding.'"

Dr. Engstrom noted that the closed-circuit color network extending throughout the extensive Fair grounds will feed into color receivers in other exhibits, restaurants, lounges, and public areas where the visitors to the

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Fair might enjoy such a service. The color television mobile unit, he said, also will be available to outside firms as well as to all exhibitors.

This Fair-wide service will provide both information and entertainment, Dr. Engstrom explained. "It will carry general reports on Fair activities, fashion shows, children's programs and general interest non-commercial material from other exhibitors.

"It also will provide a communications medium of general utility when the need arises. There is some thought, for example, of a new and highly effective use of color television as a means for reuniting lost children with their parents."

The color studio, Dr. Engstrom explained, will be fully equipped with cameras, video tape machines, and color film chains. Viewing monitors installed throughout the building will enable visitor to see on the screen the action that they observe on the production floor.

In the reception area, according to Dr. Engstrom, visitors will be able to see themselves in color television -- "an attraction that has had universal appeal at RCA exhibits throughout the world over the past few years."

The two listening rooms, once circular and one rectangular, will give visitors a chance to relax and hear stereophonic music before leaving the building. There also will be displays based on RCA's principal activities in industrial, defense and space electronics.

For RCA, probably the most demanding aspect of the RCA Exhibit will be the production of enough color shows to fill 2,000 hours a season,

SOURCE: PRESS RELEASE: RCA Department of Information, April 11, 1963

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according to J. M. Toney, Director, World's Fair Participation for RCA.

"The emphasis will be on short segments, covering things about the Fair that people would not normally know about," Mr. Toney said. "These will include odd facts, odd jobs, even films on the building of the Fair. Program material from other exhibits also will be used when the subject is of genuine public interest."

Mr. Toney pointed out that many of the people going to the Fair will not have anything like the three weeks that it will take to see all the displays. "The closed-circuit color TV network will help them see things they might otherwise have missed," he stated.

The World's Fair Corporation will use the Communications Center for hourly news bulletins.

All of this television communications activity will emanate from a building of circles and curves that will look like a careful arrangement of giant drums with white alabaster tops and copper sides.

The unique circular design results from functional demands, a circular gallery was decided on to speed traffic and to enhance visibility.

Malcolm B. Wells, who designed RCA buildings in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla., and cherry Hill, Hightstown and Somerville, N.J., is the architect for the RCA World's Fair building. John Vassos, a long-time design consultant for RCA, is industrial designer for the project.

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OFFICIAL WORLD'S FAIR COLOR TV COMMUNICATIONS CENTER

Dr. Elmer W. Engstrom (left), President of the Radio Corporation of America, discusses plans for the RCA building at the 1964-65 New York World's Fair with Robert Moses, President of the World's Fair Corporation. The Center, located near the main entrance to the Fair, will feature a spectator-type, fully equipped color TV programming facility that will be the focal point for spot TV coverage of Fair news and special events, interviews with important visitors, and a variety of entertainment shows. The programs will be distributed through what will be the nation's largest closed-circuit TV network to an estimated 200 outlets on the Fair grounds.

SOURCE: Photos (both) RCA Department of Information, April 11, 1963

Engstrom & Moses

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